TEAM

SCOTT L. NUISMER

PI

Scott is a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences whose research uses mathematical and computational models to understand and forecast biological processes. CV

ANDREW BASINSKI

Postdoctoral researcher

Andrew is a broadly trained mathematical biologist currently developing mathematical models optimizing the design and delivery of transmissible vaccines. More recently, Andrew has begun applying machine learning approaches to the challenge of forecasting pathogen spillover.

NATHAN LAYMAN

Postdoctoral researcher

Mathematical models of disease often focus on single strain pathogen dynamics. By extending these approaches to consider multiple-strains it becomes possible to address a number of interesting problems. In particular, between-strain competition can make estimating the outcomes of vaccination programs challenging. Nathan is currently working with the Nuismer lab to develop multi-strain viral models to address the following questions. First, how can reversion to virulence or loss of efficacy be prevented in transmissible vaccines? Second, how does evolution post-release influence the ability of transmissible vaccines to invade target populations? Third, how is pathogen genetic diversity influenced by fluctuating vector population sizes? Nathan is also interested in utilizing remote sensing data and predictive models to control zoonotic diseases in wildlife populations before they can threaten human populations.

ANNA SJODIN

Postdoctoral researcher

 Coming soon!

BOB WEEK

PhD Student (BCB)

My dissertation is developing a coevolutionary theory of community ecology in the context of plant-pollinator networks. Specifically, I am working on statistical methods to detect various forms of coevolution in nature and mathematical models that predict the patterns of interspecific interactions across a coevolving community. The theory of stochastic differential equations is my primary weapon for confronting these tasks. However, working with empiricists such as Paul CaraDonna keeps me tethered to reality. See https://bobweek.github.io/ for more.

TANNER VARRELMAN

PhD Student (BCB)

Tanner's research focuses on understanding how heterogeneity in host populations influences the effectiveness of transmissible vaccines and how GIS data can be used to forecast the emergence of infectious disease.

BREANNA SIPLEY

PhD Student (BCB)

Coming soon!

COURTNEY SCHREINER

BS Student (Mathematics)

Courtney's research focuses on developing mathematical models optimizing the delivery of vaccines to fluctuating wildlife populations.

BETH TUSCHHOFF

BS student (Mathematics)

Beth is using mathematical models to quantify the scope for controlling unwanted evolution in transmissible vaccines through swamping.

Alumni:

Benji Oswald (PhD)

Ben Ridenhour (Postdoc)

Virginie Poullain (PhD)

Francois Blanquart (Undergraduate/PhD)

Florence Debarre (Postdoc)

Anahi Espindola (Postdoc)

Ailene MacPherson (MS)

 

©2018 by Scott Nuismer.